Williams HR Law LLP

SECTION 7 AND THE RIGHT TO BE LEFT ALONE OUTSIDE OF WORK

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1842″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text] Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada granted leave to appeal a judgment of the Federal Court of Appeal that overturned a determination of the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board (the “PSLREB”) that not compensating employees for on-call hours violated section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights […]

THE SUPREME COURT OF CANADA TO CONSIDER THE APPLICABILITY OF HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTIONS

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1843″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]In October 2016, the Supreme Court of Canada (the “Supreme Court”) granted leave to appeal in British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Edward Schrenk (“Schrenk”). The Supreme Court’s determination will likely have significant repercussions as to the scope of human rights protections in workplace settings.

PROBATIONARY EMPLOYEES AND THE DECISION TO TERMINATE

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1844″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text] Facts Nagribianko v. Select Wine Merchants Ltd. was a wrongful dismissal action brought in Small Claims Court by the Plaintiff, Alexander Nagribianko (“Mr. Nagribianko”). Mr. Nagribianko signed an employment contract with the defendant, Select Wine Merchants Inc.

MUDDYING THE WATERS OF FAMILY STATUS ACCOMMODATION

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1845″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]This past year has seen an unsettling of the law surrounding family status discrimination under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the “Code”).

EMPLOYER’S SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNT CONSTITUTES THE WORKPLACE

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1846″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]An Arbitrator recently considered whether an employer’s social media presence could be defined as part of the “workplace” and the attendant employer obligations arising from such a finding in Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 113 v. Toronto Transit Commission (Use of Social Media Grievance). 

WHAT IS NOT WORKPLACE HARASSMENT

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]A recent grievance arbitration decision, Fanshawe College of Applied Arts and Technology v. Ontario Public Service Employees Union (“Fanshawe College”), provides valuable guidance to employers on what is – and what is not – considered workplace harassment. 

HOWARD V. BENSON GROUP HIGHLIGHTS THE RISKS OF FIXED-TERM EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENTS

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1848″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text] Employers should exercise caution in drafting fixed-term employment agreements, particularly with respect to provisions designed to shorten the term of the agreement. Where a termination provision in a fixed-term employment agreement is rendered unenforceable, the employee may be entitled to wages for the balance of the fixed term, without any […]

Workplace Investigations: Part 1 – What They Are, and Why They Matter

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1867″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]This blog is the first in a three-part series that will examine employers’ obligations with respect to conducting workplace investigations, and outline some proactive strategies that will aid employers in doing so. Part 1 will define workplace investigations, and will examine when they should be conducted, why they are necessary, and […]

THE ONTARIO RETIREMENT PENSION PLAN (BILL 186)

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1868″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text] In August 2015 we posted a blog entry outlining the Government of Ontario’s release of details surrounding the introduction of Bill 56, An Act to require the establishment of the Ontario Retirement Pension Plan in 2014. On April 14, 2016, the Ontario Legislature introduced Bill 186, the Ontario Retirement Pension […]

SUPREME COURT ENHANCES WORKERS’ CHARTER RIGHTS

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1869″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text] In early 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada (the “SCC”) released three decisions in a two-week period that collectively expanded the reach of the constitutional right of freedom of association as it pertains to collective bargaining.  Throughout the past thirty years, the SCC has periodically altered employees’ rights related to […]